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Resources to Help End Racial Injustice

Whitworth denounces the sin of racism that continues to plague our nation, our community, and our campus, and we ask every member of the Whitworth family to reflect upon ways we can take action and contribute to a more just, equitable, and humane society.

What Whitworth Offers Now

  • Programs, initiatives and events for academic year 2020-21 in our continuing efforts to achieve the Diversity Action Plan.
  • A letter from June 5, 2020, from Chief Diversity Officer Lorna Heranandez-Jarvis to the Whitworth community: Steps Whitworth Is Taking to Address Racial Injustice.
  • Zero tolerance: Read our non-discrimination statement in the Whitworth Student Handbook.
  • Counseling and pastoral care for underrepresented students.
  • A donor-supported affinity group for faculty members of color.
  • Help-a-Pirate and CARES Act assistance for students in financial need.
  • DEI Speaker Series to engage community on race-related issues.
  • Intergroup dialogue training on race and racism for students and employees.
  • Racial reconciliation groups through the Office of Church Engagement that create Christian community action plans.
  • Monthly meetings with the Spokane County Sheriff's Office to help ensure justice and equity for students of color.

How to Take Action Today

Places to support, articles to read, and other ways to learn about and support anti-racism.

  • General Resources

    Books

    Websites

    Videos

    Podcasts

    Films & TV Series to Watch

    • 13th (Ava DuVernay) - Netflix
    • Dear White People (Justin Simien) - Netflix
    • I Am Not Your Negro (James Baldwin documentary) - Available to rent or buy on Kanopy
    • If Beale Street Could Talk (Barry Jenkins) - Hulu
    • Just Mercy
    • Selma (Ava DuVernay) - Available to rent
    • The Hate U Give (George Tillman Jr.) - Hulu with Cinemax
    • When They See Us (Ava DuVernay) - Netflix
    • "How Studying Privilege Systems Can Strengthen Compassion" - Peggy McIntosh at TEDxTimberlaneSchools (18:26)
    • 12 Years a Slave - Netflix
    • Cracking the Codes
    • Light in the Shadows

    Articles

  • Resources to Talk About Race with Children/Family

  • Related Organizations

  • Christianity, Race & Racism

    Books

    Articles

    Videos

    Podcasts

    Websites

  • Relevant Courses Offered at Whitworth

    Course Numbers/Titles

    • AR 266/366 Art and Identity in the United States
    • AR 315H Community Arts in Practice
    • COM 370 Popular Culture & Women
    • DS/SO/WGS 220 Race and Ethnicity
    • DS 310 U.S. Cultural Studies: Community-Based Research
    • EC 345 Economics of Social Issues
    • EDC 503 Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling
    • EDE 401W Democracy, Leadership and Schooling
    • EDM 536A Culturally Responsive Teaching
    • EDU 367 Intro to Intercultural Educ
    • EDU 372 Refugee/Immigrant Experiences
    • EL 124 African American Literature
    • EL 127 African American Women Writers
    • EL 128 Multicultural American Lit
    • EL 132 American Immigrant Literature
    • HI 131 American History Before 1877
    • HI 212 American Popular Culture
    • HI 206 Intro to American Women
    • HI 228 Identity, Race and Power
    • HI 240 African American History to 1877
    • HI 296 Monsters and Angels of the American Past
    • HI 323 Religion in American Public Life
    • HI 362 Slavery and Civil War
    • HS 261 Community Health
    • JMC 120 Media and Society
    • JMC 370 Action Heroes to Zany Moms: Representations of Women in Popular Culture
    • MU 304 World Music Traditions
    • MU 365 International Culture Through Jazz
    • PO 140 African Life and Culture
    • PO 340 African Politics
    • PY 396 Multicultural Psychology
    • SN 419 Latin-American Culture & Civilization
    • SN 420 Spanish Culture & Civilization
    • SO 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    • SO 343H Race Across America
    • SP 461 Applied Cross-Cultural Communication
    • TH 174 Diverse Christian Leadership
    • TH 370 World Religions
    • USCS 120 Intro to U.S. Cultural Studies
    • USCS 313 Identity Formation in U.S. Cultural Context
    • USCS 201H Genealogy in Cultural Context

    Course Descriptions

    AR 266/366 Art and Identity in the United States
    The course looks exclusively at art from the United States that relates directly to how different identities have been constructed and reinforced from both inside and outside of the groups associated with those identities. For example, the course examines how Native American identities were constructed and reinforced through art made by artists of European descent as well as by Native artists during the 19th and 20th centuries, with special attention Native artists who examine/expose the tensions. The course takes a similar approach with black identities and gendered identities. 

    AR 315H Community Arts in Practice
    This course uses the text Art and Upheaval: Artists on the World's Frontlines. The book explores global devastation (some in the states, some caused by the states) and the role community art has played in healing and rebuilding. The students are asked to consider the difference between their power and privilege and those of the people shared in the book.  The course culminates in a capstone project in which the students create project for a demographic other than their own in the US.  This has yielded many thoughtful and successful projects in the past. 

    COM 370 Popular Culture & Women
    This course approaches recent popular culture in the US as more than simply entertainment. Particular attention is paid to representations of gender, sexuality, race, and class as intersecting, dynamic social categories embedded in narratives about women and feminism. Different media effects theories are explored and discussed. Cultural theory is used to learn how social anxieties, problems, and desires are constructed, managed, and challenged through cultural texts, critically analyzing how popular culture shapes who we are. Focus is on primarily visual culture, and a variety of genres and mediums.

    DS/SO/WGS 220 Race and Ethnicity
    Examines racial and ethnic relations around the world, with emphasis on the United States. Students explore race as a social construct and its intersections with class, gender and immigrant status. Emphasis is put on racism within social institutions along with analysis of beliefs and privilege at the individual level. Prerequisite: SO 120. Also listed as SO/WGS 220.

    DS 310 U.S. Cultural Studies: Community-Based Research
    This course engages students with community members to work collaboratively to address societal issues confronting diverse populations. This course is open to all students. Fall semester.

    EC 345 Economics of Social Issues
    This important assignment allows the students to hear, in the primary voice, the story of someone who was personally affected by the actions of social scientists to correct an issue of importance in the arena of diversity and equity and to reflect upon the effectiveness of the outcomes to persons involved. Although this topic is interwoven throughout the course, the assignment described below is designed specifically to provide the students with the historical foundation that completes the understanding necessary to provide context to many of the racial conflicts we see today. Diversity Paper (15%): You will work alone to prepare a paper using recommended course material/ resources to include discussions, recommended reading/ research, etc.to help shape your opinion (Detailed instructions will be handed out in class at an appropriate time.) Warriors Don't Cry: A Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock's Central High should be evaluated in relation to the material covered during the course related to the economic issues surrounding aspects of diversity through primary sources to include poverty and race. You will analyze and critically evaluate the economics of your issue and form an opinion about the issues discussed in the text. You may need to do additional research about the topic in order to adequately present both sides and form an opinion either in agreement with, or opposed to, that information, explaining the basis of your decision specifically as it pertains to information you've learned in this class. (See Course Objectives). 

    EDC 503 Social and Cultural Considerations in Counseling
    Development of effective multicultural counseling skills with diverse populations. Exploration of ethnicity, culture, gender, socioeconomic status, disability, religious beliefs, and the impact of stereotyping. Prerequisite: EDC 501 or EDC 553, and EDC 511. Fee.

    EDE 401W Democracy, Leadership and Schooling
    The brief summary of this course states that it is: A capstone course to clarify spiritual, philosophical, social and educational convictions as they relate to the teaching profession. Exploration of ways to translate worldview convictions into educational practice will be addressed through reflection papers, research, personal memoirs of the teacher as a learner. The introduction to this course examines recent statistics 10-5-1 year reports on K-12 demographics in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, language, poverty levels, education levels of parents and more. Several of the texts the students read provide first-hand accounts of the impact of poverty, abuse, neglect, or cultural assimilation pressures on the lives of young people as they navigate social expectations regarding success in school as a ladder to future economic success. Educational equity and access are the focus of much of the discussions and writing assignments students do in this class as they examine inequities in school funding formulas, what happens to schools when they are identified as failing and what options are available to children who live within the boundaries of these schools; how access to extracurricular supports and enrichment alters access to higher education and higher paying jobs and how the public school system in the US protects the status quo whether intentionally or not. Projections on ethnic, racial and language diversity will be examined as students consider the changing nature of K-12 education in the US and what that means for their preparedness to teach effectively. Even the dominant approaches to teaching which are primarily verbal and visual privilege, and the structures of K-12 schools which are typically age-based and not ability or interest-based privilege certain learners and student groups and are less accessible to cultures that use more of a storytelling and collective versus individualistic approach to education. These approaches and structures are compared to those in other countries that have improved educational outcomes compared to US statistics and who often use a later matriculation age, multi-age structures, multiple pathways for intermediate learners to choose systems that match their strengths and interests, and reduce the emphasis on achievement testing that dominates so much of K-12 American education. The psycho-social and cognitive rationale for these choices and their impacts on learners globally and domestically are considered. 

    EDM 536A Culturally Responsive Teaching
    Examination of how attitudes, behaviors and values are shaped; the nature and use of power in society, one's own values, principles of effective multicultural education, cultural influences on lea

    EDU 367 Intro to Intercultural Education
    Examination of both personal and institutional cultural proficiency in education. The impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on academic achievement is explored along with the crucial skills for effective intercultural communication. Also included is the examination of one's own cultural values, attitudes, and beliefs as they influence instruction and assessment practices used with P-12 students in the content areas. Offered only for those pursuing a teaching certificate. Prerequisite: junior standing required; senior standing recommended. Also listed as EDU 567. Fall semester.

    EDU 372 Refugee/Immigrant Experiences
    This course is a hands-on introduction to the lives of refugees and immigrants in the USA and the local area, with emphasis on second-language learning and teaching. It looks at the experiences of immigrant populations through the lens of their cultural and linguistic adjustment, including an off-campus, experiential service-learning component. Fall semester.

    EL 124 African American Literature
    Introduction to literary study through African American literature. Covers poetry, fiction, and drama. May also consider sermons, songs, and film by African Americans.

    EL 127 African American Women Writers
    This course will be built around a corpus of literary texts by African American women writers that examine the US and its culture from a variety of angles, prompting students to consider the ways that they may enter into respectful discourse with and analysis of domestic cultural contexts quite different from their own. Literary close reading, which prompts close examination of relationships and interactions represented inside a text, will be an important tool/approach. Literary close reading will be paired with Cultural Studies approaches that draw specific attention to issues of power, privilege, hierarchy, identity, and/or interdependence. 

    EL 128 Multicultural American Lit
    A multicultural introduction to careful, appreciative reading of the major literary genres (fiction, poetry, drama). Students will read and analyze texts representing at least two (and often more) minority cultural perspectives from within the US cultural context. African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and/or Native American literary works are often featured.

    EL 132 American Immigrant Literature
    This course will be built around a corpus of literary texts that examine the US and its culture from a variety of angles, prompting students to consider the ways that they may enter into respectful discourse with and analysis of domestic cultural contexts quite different from their own. Literary close reading, which prompts close examination of relationships and interactions represented inside a text, will be a an important tool/approach. Literary close reading will be paired with Cultural Studies approaches that draw specific attention to issues of power, privilege, hierarchy, identity, and/or interdependence. 

    HI 131 American History Before 1877
    Discovery and settlement of North America; the Enlightenment and the American Revolution; early democracy and reform movements; Western expansion and slavery; the sectional crisis and causes and results of the Civil War. Course taught with a biographical focus.

    HI 212 American Popular Culture
    Values and ideas that are reflected in the various forms of popular culture. Analysis of music, sport, popular art, television and cinema, with special attention to the 20th century, and intercultural communication skill training. Elementary and secondary.

    HI 206 Intro to American Women
    Explores the history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, emphasizing the changing roles of women and their contributions to and participation in American society. Key themes include women's work, politics, religious experiences, and social reform movements. The course also explores gender roles in American history and ways that race, class, region, and the passage of time alter those expectations.

    HI 228 Identity, Race and Power
    History and culture of major ethnic and racial groups in American life. Special emphasis on the role of race and nationality in the pursuit and achievement of "the American Dream." Since HI 228 includes a substantial off-campus component, students will need personal access to transportation to and from the off-campus sites. Jan Term. Fee.

    HI 240 African American History to 1877
    This course is designed to expose students to the varied and complex ways in which the identity factor of race shaped the course of American history from the colonial period through Reconstruction, for both individuals and society at large, with particular reference to African American experiences and contributions. The course explores how concepts of race and racism also shifted and changed in often contradictory ways depending on related factors such as geographic location, gender, and political affiliation, strengthening students' ability to understand the trajectory of American history using the historical skills of contextual analysis and change over time. The course is particularly invested in helping students understand how shifting conceptions of race, each dependent on equally significant identity factors such as gender and class, were used to determine who had access to power and privilege within politics and society, and also who was barred from exercising agency in these spaces. Along the way, the course also places African American historical actors at the center of this narrative, interrogating how black men and women responded to the imposition of racial and racists ideas while attempting to redefine these ideas on their own terms. The course thereby introduces students to a more complex understanding of the power dynamics at play in the first half of the nation's history by underscoring the breath of historical participants at work in this era, while also requiring students to interrogate when and how these groups are remembered in, or erased from, historical memory. 

    HI 296 Monsters and Angels of the American Past
    This course is designed to expose students to the varied and complex ways that identity factors such as race, gender, nationality, and class shaped ideas about the "monstrous" and "angelic" in the American past, which in turn enables them to grasp the underlying ideals and fears that gave rise to the social, political, and cultural structures that define the nation today. The course also explores how these identity factors shifted and changed in often contradictory ways depending on related factors such as geographic location and political affiliation, strengthening students' ability to understand the trajectory of American history using the historical skills of contextual analysis and change over time. The course is particularly invested in helping students understand how shifting conceptions of "the other" were used to determine who had access to power and privilege within politics and society, and also who was barred from exercising agency in these spaces. To do this, the course keeps the perspectives of the "othered" individuals/groups at the center, using primary sources to ask students to consider what it would have actually felt like to experience things such as being a young black woman accused of witchcraft in the 17th century or an immigrant Jewish family experiencing both nativist and religious hostility in the 19th century. The course thereby introduces students to a more complex understanding of the power dynamics at play in the American history by underscoring the breath of assumptions, mythologies, and participants involved in constructing social and cultural boundaries that continue into the present. 

    HI 323 Religion in American Public Life
    The major themes, movements, problems, people and institutions in American Christian history, with emphasis on the public practice of the Christian faith. Fall semester, even years.

    HI 362 Slavery and Civil War
    Besides providing a general overview of the social, religious, and cultural dynamics of the Civil War, this course is designed to expose students to the varied and complex ways in which the identity factor of race and racism, as expressed through chattel slavery, shaped the course of American history in the Civil War era for both individuals and society at large, with particular reference to the experiences and contributions of marginalized groups. The course explores how concepts of race and racism also shifted and changed in often contradictory ways depending on related factors such as geographic location, gender, and political affiliation before, during, and after the war, strengthening students' ability to understand the trajectory of American history using the historical skills of contextual analysis and change over time. The course is particularly invested in helping students understand how shifting conceptions of race, each dependent on equally significant identity factors such as gender and class, were used to determine who had access to power and privilege within politics and society, and also who was barred from exercising agency in these spaces. Along the way, the course also places voices that are often marginalized in cultural memories of the Civil War at the center of this narrative, interrogating in particular how African Americans and women responded to the conflict. The course thereby introduces students to a more complex understanding of the power dynamics at play in this crucial period of the nation's history by underscoring the breath of historical participants involved in the conflict, while also requiring students to interrogate when and how these groups are remembered in, or erased from, historical memory of the Civil War in the present. 

    HS 261 Community Health
    In studying Community Health, students will explore subgroups of the population with diverse health disparities, health needs, and cultural influences on behaviors which impact health outcomes. Students will also explore how sexism, racism, social inclusion/isolation, and power influence access to health and create health disparities within various groupings of the US population. Students will describe the belief systems of various subcultures in the US and describe the impact of those belief systems on health outcomes. They will apply this understanding to discussions of current events that demonstrate the complex factors that create health disparities in the US.   

    JMC 120 Media and Society
    The course will explore these issues through a focus on questions such as ownership, control and regulation of media organizations, freedom of the press and censorship, inequalities in media production and media careers, audience inequalities in access to media technology and content, inequalities in media literacy levels, representation of different groups in society, stereotypes, and ideological messages. Issues of power, privilege and identity in a U.S. cultural context are a central focus of the course. 

    JMC 370 Action Heroes to Zany Moms: Representations of Women in Popular Culture    
    This course approaches recent popular culture in the US as more than simply entertainment. Particular attention is paid to representations of gender, sexuality, race, and class as intersecting, dynamic social categories embedded in narratives about women and feminism. Different media effects theories are explored and discussed. Cultural theory is used to learn how social anxieties, problems, and desires are constructed, managed, and challenged through cultural texts, critically analyzing how popular culture shapes who we are. Focus is on primarily visual culture, and a variety of genres and mediums.

    MU 304 World Music Traditions
    Musical traditions of a variety of cultures, including Native American, African, East European and Indian. Special attention will be given to unique instruments, particularly those from Africa. The relationship of music to religion and politics will also be explored. Periodic offering.

    MU 365 International Culture Through Jazz
    A select group of Whitworth jazz students (enrollment by audition only) will travel to locations outside the United States and join with international students and instructors in various jazz classes, ensembles and concerts. Includes study of local history and culture through visits to historical and cultural sites in the host city. Offered periodically in Jan Term.

    PO 140 African Life and Culture
    Examination of representative African peoples, countries, lifestyles, and beliefs. Topics covered will include media coverage of Africa, traditional and modernizing influences on African lives today, Africans as global citizens, health, gender, religion and rites of passage. Jan Term.

    PO 340 African Politics
    Pre-colonial, colonial, and post-independence political history of key African countries. Analysis of contemporary issues in African politics.

    PY 396 Multicultural Psychology
    This course examines how culture influences the individual's thinking and behavior. It is designed to address both the universality and culture specificity of psychological principles and theories. The course address theories of multicultural psychology as they apply to African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latinx, & Native-Americans. Issues of racial identity, stereotyping, power, privilege and race relations are the focus of the course.

    SN 419 Latin-American Culture & Civilization
    Exploration of contemporary Spanish-American culture in the U.S.A. and the Americas through readings from a variety of fields. Historical survey from the earliest times to present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 301 (SN 302 recommended). Also listed as LAS 419.

    SN 420 Spanish Culture & Civilization
    Historical survey of political, social, economic, religious, literary and artistic life in Spain from the earliest times to present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 301 (SN 302 recommended). Also listed as EMS 420.

    SO 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
    This course has two basic objectives: to develop a framework for understanding other cultures and to learn skills to communicate that understanding. Through a systematic investigation of the nature of culture and a comparative study of cultures and peoples known to humankind at the present time, it is expected that we can better understand ourselves and the social world around us. Offered Jan Term in Hawaii.

    SO 343H Race Across America
    This unique Amtrak study tour across America exposes students to the history and experience of non-white racial/ethnic groups. These histories, communicated via museum exhibitions, tours, and special lecturers, detail the contributions, sufferings and cultures of these groups. These specific analyses are complemented by an examination of the general sociological dynamics of race in America. Prerequisites: selection by instructor, completion of SO 120. Jan Term, odd years

    SP 461 Applied Cross-Cultural Communication
    Explores the importance of competent communication in the international arena. Study of how elements such as ritual, status, symbolism, concepts of time and use of space create our world view. This course will provide opportunities for students to enhance both professional and interpersonal skills in the area of communicating effectively across cultures. The intent is to broaden cultural awareness and enhance multicultural literacy as applied in nonacademic settings. For continuing studies students only.

    TH 174 Diverse Christian Leadership
    This course will explore issues of power, privilege, identity, and injustice in the United States in regard to race and gender in particular through the readings, activities, guest speakers, and lectures outlined above. The focus of the course is race and diversity in America, particularly as it relates to Christian leadership. 

    TH 370 World Religions
    A study of the primary non-Christian religions of the world, with special emphasis on the beliefs and practices of those religions. Spring semester.

    USCS 120 Intro to U.S. Cultural Studies
    This course introduces students to cultural studies in the contemporary United States.

    USCS 313 Identity Formation in U.S. Cultural Context
    This course fulfills the three primary goals of the U.S. Cultural Studies Minor by focusing on racial identity development (African American, Latino, Asian American, American Indian, White, Multiracial, etc.) in the United States. Students will have opportunities for self-exploration in how their racial identity has been shaped. Fall semester, periodic.

    USCS 201H Genealogy in Cultural Context
    This course introduces students to genealogical and historical research in the framework of diverse viewpoints within American society. Students will analyze the cultural diversity of their family history, with particular attention to placing their family in historical context. Spring semester.

Help Us Learn

Suggest resources for the Whitworth community: ideas@whitworth.edu.

Recognizing that various policy debates are ongoing regarding specific measures that would contribute to racial justice, Whitworth offers these resources with the recognition that the university neither explicitly supports nor endorses any particular policy consideration. These resources are provided to the community for your research and consideration.