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Upcoming Gifted Education Institutes

Experience on-campus institutes that will help you grow as a professional and learn to address contemporary issues in gifted education.

More details are below for our virtual webinar series "Giftedness Knows No Boundaries: Equity, Access & Opportunity for All Learners" and our summer institute "Mind the Gap: Strategies for Adapting Curriculum to Deepen Student Learning." 

If you have questions about the registration process, please contact the Center for Gifted Education at 509.777.3226 or gifted@whitworth.edu

After attending Whitworth's Institute on Differentiation last summer, I decided almost immediately that Whitworth was the best place to continue my education. The depth of knowledge, professionalism, and caring communication I saw from everyone I met there made Whitworth my clear decision.

Nick Castilleja, M.A.T., Gifted & Talented

Giftedness Knows No Boundaries: Equity, Access & Opportunity for All Learners

The equity of learning opportunities and accessibility to high-quality experiences are concerns at the forefront of all education programs and services. Recent changes and enduring circumstances in our schools and communities have provided us with an opportunity to reflect on how we see, understand, teach and challenge highly capable and high-achieving students. Through this six-session virtual webinar series, we will explore and discuss the roles that equity, access and opportunity play in identifying student potential; understanding the psychosocial development of highly capable students and the diversity with which they express their potential; fostering high potential in early childhood to secondary students; engaging students through instructional strategies; and effectively challenging students, even through remote learning. This webinar series provides educational stakeholders with an opportunity to ask questions and (re)examine how we serve students.

REGISTER NOW

  • Dates: Tuesdays, Feb. 16-March 23, 2021
    • Register for individual sessions or all six sessions
  • Time: 4-5:30 p.m.
  • Location: Virtually via Zoom
  • Cost: $30 per person, per session; $150 per person for all six

Schedule

DateTopic

Feb. 16

See Me: Equitable Identification of High Potential

Feb. 23

Understand Me: Diverse Expressions of Talent

March 2

Understand Me: Psychosocial Development and Asynchrony

March 9

Select one:

  • Teach Me: Providing Optimal Challenge in Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms
  • Teach Me: Providing Optimal Challenge in Middle and High School Classrooms

March 16

Challenge Me: Cultivating a Culture of Thinking and Enhancing Academic Discourse in the Classroom

March 23

Challenge Me: Effective and Efficient Strategies for Remote Learning with Advanced Students

Additional Information

Payment Information and Cancellation/Refund Policy

Payments with credit cards can be made via the online registration form. We also accept checks and purchase orders. Please email purchase orders to gifted@whitworth.edu or mail them to:

Whitworth University
Center for Gifted Education
300 W. Hawthorne Road
Spokane, WA 99251

Refunds will be made if paid registrations are canceled by 5 p.m. PST on Friday, Feb. 5, 2021. Requests for refunds received after this date will be considered on a case-by-case basis. 

Contact the Center for Gifted Education at gifted@whitworth.edu or 509.777.3226 to cancel your registration and request a refund.

Academic Credit/Clock Hours

You may elect to receive one graduate-level credit from Whitworth University for an additional fee of $150. There will be additional course assignments for those receiving graduate-level credit. There wil be additional course assignments and you must attend all six sessions. This credit can be used to meet the elective requirement for the Washington State Gifted Education Specialty Endorsement offered at Whitworth. One graduate-level semester credit equals 15 Washington State Approved Clock Hours. If interested in registering for the academic credit, email gifted@whitworth.edu

Washington State Approved Clock Hours will be available for an additional fee.  

Session Descriptions

See Me: Equitable Identification of High Potential

Identification has become a challenge for school districts with the renewed efforts to ensure equitability. High academic potential exists in students from all different backgrounds, but it is not always recognized effectively, especially among students from traditionally underserved populations. In this session, we will discuss the current recommendations on the appropriateness of different standardized tests, how test results should be used and reviewed, and practical methods and program processes for identifying student potential.

Understand Me: Diverse Expressions of Talent

Students' cultural backgrounds, as well as their access to high quality learning opportunities, can influence how students express their potential. Understanding how students' experiences shape their academic performance and expression of potential or gifted behaviors is critical to providing students with appropriate and challenging instruction. In this session, we will explore the motivations, behaviors and potential that may underly students' actions and performances and what needs they indicate.

Understand Me: Psychosocial Development and Asynchrony

Characteristics associated with giftedness interact with other personal qualities and contexts to influence how students develop. Some of these characteristics may pose challenges to students' social and emotional balance and adjustment; yet many of these same characteristics can be viewed as assets and guideposts on ways to help students focus their energy toward (identity) the creation of a creative and productive life. Educators who are aware of some of the environmental and educational challenges faced by students can assist in creating learning environments that support both their academic and social and emotional growth. In this session, we will explore some of the characteristics of asynchronous development as well as examine instructional approaches, strategies and resources that can be used by educators (including classroom, gifted education specialists and counselors) to provide optimal support of advanced potential in our educational settings.

Teach Me: Providing Optimal Challenge in Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms  

Gifted behaviors are often expressed as potential, particularly in the early grades. For students to grow and learn, this potential needs to be stimulated and supported. To maximize and encourage the curiosity of early learners and develop their strengths, we should provide them with advanced learning opportunities. These high-quality learning experiences are responsive to student needs, provide exposure to problem solving and critical thinking, are accessible by all students, and allow for optimal challenge and student growth. This session will focus on how to design and modify curriculum and learning experiences to maximize learning and growth in student potential in the early childhood and elementary classrooms.

Teach Me: Providing Optimal Challenge in Middle and High School Classrooms

At the heart of the instructional environment for advanced learners is the concept of optimal challenge. An instructional environment that removes the ceiling from learning may result in higher expectations, access to more advanced content, and greater scope for academic growth for all students, including those with high potential who may be overlooked through traditional identification methods. This session will focus on how to design and adjust learning experiences that enable growth for students with high levels of prior knowledge and skill and for those ready to work with content in more complex ways.

Challenge Me: Cultivating a Culture of Thinking and Enhancing Academic Discourse in the Classroom

As Lev Vygotsky wrote, "Children grow into the intellectual life of those around them." To the extent that this is true, models of thinking and questioning are important for students to acquire as they strive to take on new ways of thinking and being in the world. High-quality questioning supports a culture in which students are not only challenged, but expect to be challenged as they become thoughtful, confident and independent learners. This session will focus on strategies and routines for developing classroom cultures of thinking that are more deliberately focused on developing young learners who can think, create and question, while simultaneously interact with their peers as they work to construct meaning, make their thinking visible and actively engage in rich academic discourse.

Challenge Me: Effective and Efficient Strategies for Remote Learning with Advanced Students

Advanced students need challenging and intellectually stimulating instruction to grow and maximize their potential. These advanced learning experiences often require differentiating the content and process of a lesson, increasing task complexity, and engaging students in higher level critical thinking. Providing highly capable students with these advanced learning opportunities can be challenging, particularly through remote and virtual learning. In this webinar we will discuss how to effectively and efficiently develop and integrate instructional strategies that challenge advanced learners in remote learning environments.

Presenters
Jann Leppien 

Jann Leppien, Ph.D., is the Margo Long Endowed Chair in Gifted Education and a professor in the Graduate School of Education at Whitworth University. Whitworth's Center for Gifted Education supports policies that encourage the diverse expressions of gifts and talents and offers a Gifted Education Specialty Endorsement and Master of Arts in Teaching: Emphasis in Gifted and Talented programs. She is the co-author of The Multiple Menu Model: A Practical Guide for Developing Differentiated Curriculum, and The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop High Potential and Challenge High-Ability Students. She has served on the board of the National Association for Gifted Children and currently serves on the Gifted Advisory Board for Washington, the 2e Center for Research and Professional Development for 2e students. She is president of Edufest, a summer teaching and learning institute in gifted education (www.edufest.org). She also provides professional development in the areas of identification, program services and advanced curriculum design.

 

Rebecca L. O'Brien, Ph.D. is currently an Assistant Professor of Gifted Education in the Graduate Studies of Education department at Whitworth University. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with a concentration in Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent Development from the University of Connecticut. She Before receiving her doctorate, she taught science, math, and robotics at a middle school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Her research primarily focuses on characteristics and behaviors that encourage and limit the identification of high potential behaviors, particularly in students from underserved populations. Additionally, she has experience and professional interest in assessment, instrument development, and teacher learning.

Mind the Gap: Strategies for Adapting Curriculum to Deepen Student Learning

Curriculum is a critical factor in student success, particularly for students who have high potential or who have been identified as highly capable. Teachers, administrators and instructional specialists are required to meet the diverse needs of all students, but oftentimes the curriculum alone is unable to accomplish this task. This three-day institute will equip educators with curricular strategies and instructional practices to adapt curriculum in a way that effectively differentiates students with academic potential, including those from underrepresented populations, and deepens student learning.

REGISTRATION will open spring 2021

  • Dates: June 23-25, 2021
  • Time: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
  • Location: Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Road, Spokane, WA 99251
  • Cost: $375 per person (includes lunches)

Schedule

TimeActivity
9-10:15 a.m.

Keynote Presentations

Wed., June 23

Title Pending - Liz Fogarty, Ph.D.

Thurs., June 24

Instructional Complexity: The Challenge of Advanced Curriculum for Teachers – Catherine Little, Ph.D.

Fri., June 25

When Equitable Identification and Service Collide – Rebecca O'Brien, Ph.D. 

10:15-10:30 a.m.  Break
10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.   Morning Breakout Sessions (choose one to attend all three days)
  1. Building a Mathematical Discourse Toolkit – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.
  2. Promoting Critical Literacy with Social Justice Minded Gifted Students – Liz Fogarty, Ph.D.
  3. Curiosity: Cat Killer or Mother of Invention? – Brian Housand, Ph.D.
  4. Questioning and Answers and What Happens in Between – Catherine Little, Ph.D.
  5. Dancing with Decimals – Rachel McAnallen, Ph.D.
12 -1 p.m.  Lunch
1-2:30 p.m. Afternoon Breakout Sessions 
  1. I'm Done. What Should I Do Now? Making Mathematics Curriculum Challenging for All – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.
  2. Curricular Strategies in Literacy: SEM-R and Flexible Grouping – Liz Fogarty, Ph.D.
  3. Developing Deeper Student Agency: Implementing Student Investigations – Jann Leppien, Ph.D.
  4. Supporting Advanced Learners in the Humanities: Adapting ELA and Social Studies Curriculum – Catherine Little, Ph.D.
  5. Minimizing the Muddle: Adapting Curriculum In the Middle Grades (5th – 8th) – Rebecca O'Brien, Ph.D.
2:30-2:45 p.m. Break
2:45-4 p.m.

Special Topics and Q&A

Wednesday, June 23

  1. Exploring Projects M2 and M3– Janine Firmender, Ph.D.
  2. Joyfully Collapsing: Low-Prep Differentiation for Mixed-Ability Classrooms (Part A) – Sarah Pack
  3. Failure is the Only Option – Brian Housand, Ph.D.
  4. Empowering Children Through Courageous Conversations, Dialogue, and Discussion (Part A) - Jann Leppien, Ph.D.
  5. The Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and the Psychosocial Strategies for Developing One's Potential (Part A) – Margo Long
  6. If You Fold It, They Will Come: Math Enrichment Beyond the Textbook (Part A) – Rachel McAnallen, Ph.D.

Thursday, June 24

  1. Facilitating Student Generated Investigations – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.
  2. Joyfully Collapsing: Low-Prep Differentiation for Mixed-Ability Classrooms (Part B) – Sarah Pack
  3. Fighting Fake News – Brian Housand, Ph.D.
  4. Empowering Children Through Courageous Conversations, Dialogue, and Discussion (Part B) – Jann Leppien, Ph.D.
  5. The Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and the Psychosocial Strategies for Developing One's Potential (Part B) – Margo Long
  6. If You Fold It, They Will Come: Math Enrichment Beyond the Textbook (Part B) – Rachel McAnallen, Ph.D.

Friday, June 25

Attend a special informal session, or we should say friendly conversation, where you can pose questions and receive feedback about issues of concern to you. Please select from the following topics:

  1. Supporting Mathematical Talent – Janine Firmender, Ph.D. and Rachal McAnallen, Ph.D.
  2. Strategies for Supporting Precocious Readers – Liz Fogerty, Ph.D. and Brian Housand, Ph.D.
  3. Common Sense about Identification Practices – Jann Leppien, Ph.D. and Sarah Pack
  4. Developing Potential in the Early Grades – Catherine Little, Ph.D. and Rebecca O'Brien, Ph.D.

Additional Information

  • Check-in for the institute will begin at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, June 23, 2021. All registered participants will receive an email at least one week before the event with detailed check-in and event information.
  • We recommend you bring a laptop computer or tablet. Free wireless will be provided.
  • There is no dress code for this institute; however, we recommend that you dress in layers to maintain your comfort.

Payment Information and Cancellation/Refund Policy

Payments with credit cards can be made via the online registration form. We also accept checks and purchase orders. Please email purchase orders to gifted@whitworth.edu or mail them to:

Whitworth University
Center for Gifted Education
300 W. Hawthorne Road
Spokane, WA 99251

All monies will be refunded if paid registrations are canceled by 5 p.m. PST on Friday, June 4, 2021. Requests for refunds received after this date will be considered on a case-by-case basis. All paid registrations will receive a full refund if the event is cancelled due to COVID-19 concerns.

Contact the Center for Gifted Education at gifted@whitworth.edu or 509.777.3226 to cancel your registration and request a refund.

Academic Credit/Clock Hours

You may elect to receive one graduate-level credit from Whitworth University for an additional fee of $150. There will be additional course assignments for those receiving graduate-level credit. This credit can be used to meet the elective requirement for the Washington State Gifted Education Specialty Endorsement offered at Whitworth. One graduate-level semester credit equals 15 Washington State Approved Clock Hours. Registration for credit will occur during the institute. 

Washington State Approved Clock Hours will be available for an additional fee. Contact gifted@whitworth.edu if you have questions.

Meals

Lunches are included in the registration fee. On the registration form, you will have the opportunity to inform us of any dietary needs.

Travel

The institute will be held on campus at Whitworth University. See here for a campus map and driving directions. 

For a list of local accommodations, see here. We have not reserved a block of rooms at a hotel. However, several hotels on our accommodations list offer special Whitworth University rates. To receive the special rate, use the provided online code or inform the hotel you are attending an event at Whitworth when making your reservation.

Session Descriptions

Keynote Presentations

To be determined – Liz Fogarty, Ph.D.

Description to be determined.

Instructional Complexity: The Challenge of Advanced Curriculum for Teachers – Catherine Little, Ph.D.

Advanced curriculum stands as one of the essential pillars of services for high-ability learners. Through access to advanced curriculum, students have opportunities to grow and learn not only content, but also more about themselves as learners. Such curriculum presents myriad challenges not only for students but also for their teachers, who must wrestle with complexity and ambiguity as they engage learners in pursuing growth. This session explores challenges that advanced curriculum presents to teachers and approaches to supporting professional growth.

When Equitable Identification and Service Collide – Rebecca O'Brien, Ph.D.

Identification procedures involve high-stakes decisions through which some students are included and others are excluded. The method of identification of students for gifted programs has been a point of contention of decades and equitable identification is a challenge for many gifted programs. Even when programs are successful in identifying diverse expressions of giftedness and potential, we can't guarantee that these students will be successful in advanced academic programs. I'll share research-based practices (and their practical applications) for identifying and providing services that support all high potential learners.

Morning Breakout Sessions

Building a Mathematical Discourse Toolkit – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.

Move beyond simply asking "Why?" Instructional tools, such as talk moves, the talk frame, and mathematical writing can help promote in-depth mathematical conceptual understanding, reasoning, and creativity. Come explore the tools and practices for establishing a mathematical learning community to foster students' engagement in discourse and engage students in exploring their mathematical thinking through oral and written discourse.

Promoting Critical Literacy with Social Justice Minded Gifted Students – Liz Fogarty, Ph.D.

Students often blindly accept the messages in digital and print media. Developing critical literacy allows gifted students, often sensitive to issues of social justice, to examine picture books, novels, and digital media with a critical eye to combat social injustice from positions of knowledge rather than intuition. Gain an understanding of how critical literacy can be used as a tool to examine concepts of race, gender, power, and their positioning within media and encourage students toward social justice action.

Curiosity: Cat Killer or Mother of Invention? – Brian Housand, Ph.D.

Curiosity is an essential skill for creative success and a trait that gifted students possess in abundance, but a typical classroom often leaves little space for students' questions. While inquisitive children have long been warned that "curiosity killed the cat", it is precisely that level of incessant wonderment and investigation that fuels creativity and innovation. Together we will explore practical ways for easily integrating student curiosity into daily lessons. You will be provided with a Pandora's box of intriguing puzzlements to ignite students' interests and strategies to help propel them towards creative productivity.

Questioning and Answers and What Happens in Between – Catherine Little, Ph.D.

Questioning interactions form a centerpiece of classroom practice and much of the substance of the learning process in action. But what do we really mean when we talk about higher-level questioning? What types of questions and patterns of interaction will encourage students to think critically and creatively? This session explores some of what we know about classroom questioning as an approach to promoting higher-level thinking and supporting differentiated learning. We will explore questioning models and some guidelines for reflecting on and strengthening questioning practices, and we will analyze some classroom-based cases to consider what works and doesn't work with questioning approaches.

Dancing with Decimals – Rachel McAnallen, Ph.D.

Are decimals driving your students crazy? Is teaching them driving you crazy, the decimals, that is? Do your students really, really understand why a number raised to a negative exponent is a fraction and not a negative number? How can students understand scientific notation if they don't understand exponents? This session will take the participants from standard form/notation through expanded, distributive, exponential, and algebraic form on both the left and right place/side of the decimal point. Money (fake) and decimal dice will be used in this workshop to understand the big idea of base ten place value. Come prepared to laugh and have fun.

Afternoon Breakout Sessions

I'm Done. What Should I Do Now? Making Mathematics Curriculum Challenging for All – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.

Research shows that some academically talented students may have already mastered many concepts and skills taught during a school year. When it comes to adapting mathematics curriculum to meet the needs of mathematically talented students there are many strategies to choose from. In this session, we explore strategies such as engaging students in tasks that foster student inquiry by requiring more than just rote memorization and procedural knowledge, implementing learning experiences to encourage mathematical creativity, differentiating through tiered tasks, and curriculum compacting.

Curricular Strategies in Literacy: SEM-R and Flexible Grouping – Liz Fogarty, Ph.D.

When young talented readers are reading several grade levels above their peers, guided reading groups are unlikely to provide an adequately challenging environment. However, there are strategies available that can be used in conjunction with guided reading to provide instructional rigor. Based on the Schoolwide Enrichment Model Reading framework, specific examples of powerful texts, differentiated teaching strategies, and ideas for setting up a classroom environment that facilitates success will be provided. Participants will leave the session with practical methods and materials that can be used to strengthen existing reading programs, and provide powerful differentiation for talented readers.

Developing Deeper Student Agency: Implementing Student Investigations – Jann Leppien, Ph.D.

Student agency has been defined as the capacity and propensity to take purposeful initiative, where students are not passive participants in their learning but active participants engaged in seeking experiences, meaning, and purpose that help them achieve the accomplishments they desire. This is all quite possible when students are provided opportunities to conduct self-initiated investigations. When carefully designed and skillfully facilitated, students' interest-based studies can result in increased intrinsic motivation, growth in 21st-century critical and creativity skills, greater self-efficacy toward research and creative productivity, and authentic learning experiences. Investigations put students in the driver's seat and provide opportunities for students' unique personalities, curiosities, and strengths to be revealed. If you want to assist students in conducting investigations and nurture their power to act on their own behalf, yet need tools and strategies to ensure their success, this strand is for you!

Supporting Advanced Learners in the Humanities: Adapting ELA and Social Studies Curriculum – Catherine Little, Ph.D.

The humanities may be described as "the study of how people process and document the human experience" (Stanford Humanities Center), and in schools we explore these studies most extensively in ELA and social studies classes. What kinds of approaches and considerations are most important for adapting these subjects to respond to advanced learners? In this session, we explore elements of curriculum in ELA and social studies that provide a rich context for engaging and challenging advanced learners. We address considerations for content, questioning and task development, and interdisciplinary connections with examples across several grade levels.

Minimizing the Muddle: Adapting Curriculum In the Middle Grades (5th – 8th) – Rebecca O'Brien, Ph.D.

The middle grades are tough and the density of the content and the confusion of adolescent identity development compound that challenge. The dimensions and varied needs of high potential learners make this challenge even more complex. Each day of this strand, we will explore different methods for increasing the intellectual demand of content, skills, and activities. We will break down approaches for incorporating critical thinking, questioning, computational thinking, and feedback as tools for modifying complexity.

Special Topics

Exploring Projects M2 and M3 – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.

Come explore research-based advanced level mathematics curriculum for grades K-6 students. The tasks and investigations in Project M2: Mentoring Young Mathematicians (K-2) and Project M3: Mentoring Mathematical Minds position students as student mathematicians to foster thinking, reasoning, and communication. This session provides an overview of the curriculum and opportunities to engage in Project M2 and M3 investigations.

Joyfully Collapsing: Low-Prep Differentiation for Mixed-Ability Classrooms (Part A & B) – Sarah Pack

"True teachers use themselves as bridges over which they invite their students to cross; then, having facilitated their crossing, joyfully collapse, encouraging them to create bridges of their own." Nikos Kazantzakis

This two-day special session invites participants to explore Dr. Kaplan's Depth and Complexity prompts for critical thinking and discover ways in which to use these prompts for differentiating learning objectives and learning tasks in mixed ability or cluster-grouped classrooms.

Fighting Fake News – Brian Housand, Ph.D.

In 2006, we first learned that even the brightest students were easily fooled by internet hoaxes like the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. While we tried to laugh this as the folly of misguided youth, a decade later we witnessed the rise of fake news and its impact on a "post-truth" world overrun by an ever growing network of social media. To fight for truth, justice, and yes, even the American way, this session presents a collection of superhero themed critical thinking activities designed to empower you and your students conquer the evils of fake news.

Empowering Children Through Courageous Conversations, Dialogue, and Discussion (Part A & B) – Jann Leppien, Ph.D.

As Lev Vygotsky wrote, "children grow into the intellectual life of those around them," and the extent that this is true, models of thinking and learning are important for students to see as they strive to take on new ways of thinking and being in the world. A great discussion is one of the best ways to engage people of all ages, to make student learning visible, and to create a sense of community. This session will focus on how to foster discussions and activate discussions that matter in our curriculum. We will also explore strategies and routines from the Cultures of Thinking Project (Harvard's Project Zero), for developing classroom cultures of thinking that are more deliberately focused on developing learners who can think, create, and question, while simultaneously interact with their peers as they work to construct meaning, make their thinking visible, and actively engage in rich conversations.

The Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and the Psychosocial Strategies for Developing One's Potential (Part A & B) – Margo Long

This two-day session addresses the social and emotional needs of talented youth and the psychosocial skills necessary to continually develop one's talent. You cannot assume that students who are highly capable already have the skills, dispositions, and strategies necessary to meet their goals and fulfill their potential. If we want our students to engage in difficult tasks that develop their talent, what are the underlying behaviors and skills necessary to attack and accomplish difficult assignments? Psychosocial skills address how individuals engage with their environment (including other people), their aspirations, and their problems.  These skills, such as mental toughness, or dealing with stress or adversity are not a substitute for talent or hard work but are just as important and are malleable. This session will focus on the type of environments that foster positive and productive learning outcomes and examines strategies that help students become more proactive as they grow their talent.

If You Fold It, They Will Come: Math Enrichment Beyond the Textbook (Part A & B) – Rachel McAnallen, Ph.D.

All origami begins with putting the hands in motion. Understanding something intellectually and knowing the same thing tactilely are very different experiences. To learn origami, you must fold it.  In this two-day special topic, the participants will build math models through the use of unit/modular origami.  Inherent in all the folding is the wonderful world of transformational geometry. Everyone will leave the session with several models in hand and for those who have origami experience, not to worry, differentiation is alive and well. Bring patience, perseverance and a sense of humor to this workshop

Facilitating Student Generated Investigations – Janine Firmender, Ph.D.

Through student generated investigations of real problems students have the opportunity to make a positive change in their school, community, or the world. In this session, explore how teachers can inspire students to tackle real problems and persevere throughout the process to see it through from "bright idea" to completion. 

Failure is the Only Option – Brian Housand, Ph.D.

There is an F word NOT being said in most schools, and gifted children, in particular, need to hear it, early and often: FAILURE. This session provides you with a curated collection of life lessons or Recipes for Disaster and Success designed to meaningfully challenge and stretch gifted kids both cognitively, affectively, and socially in a variety of settings.

Presenters
 

Janine M. Firmender, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Teacher Education Department at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where she teaches courses in the areas of Early Childhood/Elementary (grades pre-k – 4) education and elementary mathematics education. She is also pursuing research interests in the areas of engaging students in mathematical writing and meeting the needs of mathematically talented students. In 2015 she co-led the Elementary Mathematical Writing Task Force, supported through a National Science Foundation conference grant. Dr. Firmender earned her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with a concentration in Gifted Education from the Neag School of Education at the University of Education and also focused on studying elementary mathematics education. Additionally, she has been an active member of the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics, the National Association for Gifted Children, and NAGC STEM network. She was chair of the NAGC Computers and Technology Network, served on the NAGC Advisory Board for their practitioner journal, Teaching of High Potential, and currently writes the iMATHINATION column for Teaching for High Potential.

 

Elizabeth Fogarty, Ph.D. is a Lecturer in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Minnesota where she coordinates a K-12 Reading Licensure program. Liz is deeply concerned with providing excellent strategies for teachers of reading and language arts from pre-service through in-service levels. Hallmarks in her practice include weaving together up to date content and resources, equity practices, and pedagogy that makes room for the needs of gifted and talented students. Liz currently serves as Vice President of the Minnesota Educators of the Gifted and Talented and lives in Chaska, Minnesota with her husband and two children.

 

Brian Housand, Ph.D is the coordinator of the Academically or Intellectually Gifted program at University of North Carolina Wilmington. He earned a Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Connecticut with an emphasis in both gifted education and instructional technology. He served two terms on the National Association for Gifted Children's Board of Directors as a Member-At-Large. Along with his wife Dr. Angela Housand and Dr. Joe Renzulli, he co-authored Using the Schoolwide Enrichment Model with Technology. He is also the author of Fighting Fake News! Teaching Critical Thinking and Media Literacy in a Digital Age. Brian has worked in education as a classroom teacher, a teacher of the gifted, and a university professor for over twenty years. As a speaker and consultant, he has presented in 40 states, Canada, Australia, South Korea, Kuwait, and Chilé. Brian is a lover of technology, Star Wars, all things Disney, video games, and fonts. He proudly identifies himself as a geek. You can learn more on his website at brianhousand.com and by following him on Twitter @brianhousand

 

Jann Leppien, Ph.D., is the Margo Long Endowed Chair in Gifted Education and a professor in the Graduate School of Education at Whitworth University. Whitworth's Center for Gifted Education supports policies that encourage the diverse expressions of gifts and talents and offers a Gifted Education Specialty Endorsement and Master of Arts in Teaching: Emphasis in Gifted and Talented programs. She is the co-author of The Multiple Menu Model: A Practical Guide for Developing Differentiated Curriculum, and The Parallel Curriculum: A Design to Develop High Potential and Challenge High-Ability Students. She has served on the board of the National Association for Gifted Children and currently serves on the Gifted Advisory Board for Washington, the 2e Center for Research and Professional Development for 2e students. She is president of Edufest, a summer teaching and learning institute in gifted education (www.edufest.org). She also provides professional development in the areas of identification, program services and advanced curriculum design.

 

Rebecca L. O'Brien, Ph.D. is currently an Assistant Professor of Gifted Education in the Graduate Studies of Education department at Whitworth University. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with a concentration in Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent Development from the University of Connecticut. She Before receiving her doctorate, she taught science, math, and robotics at a middle school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Her research primarily focuses on characteristics and behaviors that encourage and limit the identification of high potential behaviors, particularly in students from underserved populations. Additionally, she has experience and professional interest in assessment, instrument development, and teacher learning.

 

Catherine Little, Ph.D. is a Professor in Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent Development in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut. Her research interests include professional learning, differentiation of curriculum and instruction, and classroom questioning practices. She currently works as the project director for Project SPARK and Project LIFT, both of which are federally-funded research initiatives focused on working with schools to recognize and respond to advanced academic potential in the early grades, particularly in students from underserved populations.

 

Associate Professor Emerita, Margo Long served as an Associate Professor of Education and supervisor of secondary-level education students for the School of Education at Whitworth University until her retirement. She founded and directed the Center for Gifted Education & Professional Development. Margo's specialty areas are underachievement of gifted students and principles of instruction. She also emphasizes teaching creatively to help young people engage in problem solving opportunities to address real issues of concern. As an educational consultant in the Pacific Northwest, Margo's repertoire includes keynote addresses to school districts, education groups, and gifted education organizations, as well as workshops and training sessions for the teaching and health professions and the business sector. Some of her recent presentations include teaching the underachiever, strategies for teaching bright children in the regular classroom, dealing productively with changes and choices, pathways to excellence, time/stress management, and coping with the future.

 

Sarah Pack is a Nationally Board-Certified High School English Language Arts teacher who is currently serving as Pasco School District's Highly Capable Teacher on Special Assignment. Sarah has worked for the Pasco School district for the last 14 years, most notably at Delta High School, a STEM high school where she was awarded three times for her innovative and collaborative instruction using long-term project-based learning practices to integrate English Language Arts curricula with STEM classes such as Advanced Organic Chemistry and Algebra. However, her greatest honors are being asked by Delta's graduating class of 2014 and 2017 to deliver the keynote speech at their commencement ceremonies. Sarah holds a bachelor's degree in Secondary English Education from Eastern Washington University and a Master's degree in Strategic Communication from Washington State University.

 

Rachel McAnallen, Ph.D., known simply as "Ms. Math" to children across the country, has devoted her life to sharing the joy and beauty of mathematics with learners of all ages. A professional educator for over half a century, Rachel travels the world teaching her subject at every grade level. In addition to her experience in the classroom, Rachel has served as a department chair, a school board member, and a high school administrator— she claims the latter position is responsible for the majority of her gray hairs. Rachel has a passion for teaching, golf, and mathematical modular origami, though not always in that order. As a life-long learner, Rachel has completed her Ph.D. at the University of Connecticut at age 75. Rachel approaches the world around her with a boundless curiosity and a playful sense of humor that is reflected in her teaching style. Check out Ms. Math's website www.zoidandcompany.com.